Fixing the Biolinum Font in Beamer

The libertine package provides LaTeX support to the Linux Libertine and Linux Biolinum fonts. The package release dated 2011-06-06 contains a bug, in which the ex unit value of the san serif font, Linux Biolinum, is not set correctly. This causes problems if the libertine package is used in a beamer presentation:

Notice how the heights of the headline and footline coloured boxes are almost zero. The same thing happens to the itemized and enumerated list markers, too.

A bug report has been filed with the LinuxLibertine project, but it’s still open at the time of writing.

In the meantime, Ulrike Fischer and Robin Fairbairns have provided an interim solution by resetting the ex value in the .fd files. Here’s what I did following their suggestions.

Locate the Biolinum .fd files, which should be in $TEXMF/tex/latex/libertine/ . I usually work with T1 encoding, so I homed in on the files t1fxb.fd, t1fxbf.fd, t1fxbj.fd, t1fxbjo.fd and t1fxbo.fd. (All these files, because sometimes I want the old-style numbers fonts.) I then added the code in red below for each m-n series-shapes:

\DeclareFontShape{T1}{fxb}{m}{n}{
\fxl@@scale fxbr-t1
}{\fontdimen5\font=\fontcharht\font`\x}

I didn’t bother with the \DeclareFontShape of other series-shapes, as the above seems to have fixed the problem for me:

So hopefully this’ll help anyone else who’s run into a similar predicament. Thanks again to Ulrike and Robin for the solution.

Cyberjaya, an MMU Beamer Theme

And here’s Cyberjaya, a Beamer theme based on Multimedia University’s (MMU) colours. (Cyberjaya, Selangor, Malaysia is where MMU’s main campus is located.)

Screenshots and download link:

Brief example using the theme:

\documentclass[compress]{beamer}
\usetheme{Cyberjaya}

\author{This is Me}
\title{This is My Presentation}

\begin{document}

\begin{frame}[plain,t]
\titlepage
\end{frame}

\begin{frame}
\frametitle{First Frame}
My content
\end{frame}

\end{document}

Gelugor, a USM Beamer Theme

Just last week, I had another Beamer-related inquiry from a postdoctoral fellow at the School of Mathematical Sciences, Universiti Sain Malaysia (USM). Was it possible to have a Beamer theme modelled after USM’s Powerpoint template?

I came up with Gelugor over the weekend. (Gelugor, Penang, Malaysia is the town where USM’s main campus is located.)

Screenshots and download link:

Brief example using the theme:

\documentclass{beamer}
\usetheme{Gelugor}

\author{This is Me}
\title{This is My Presentation}

\begin{document}

\begin{frame}[plain,t]
\titlepage
\end{frame}

\begin{frame}
\frametitle{First Frame}
My content
\end{frame}

\ThankYouFrame

\end{document}

Skudai, a Beamer Theme for UTM

This all started a couple of months back when Najmi asked me if it was possible to get a Beamer presentation to look like his university’s (Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, UTM) Powerpoint template.

The eventual result is Skudai, a UTM Beamer theme. (Skudai is the name of the city town in Johor, Malaysia, where UTM’s main campus is located.)

Screenshots and download link:

A brief example on using the theme:

\documentclass{beamer}
\usetheme{Skudai}

\author{This is Me}
\title{This is My Presentation}

\begin{document}

\begin{frame}[t]
\titlepage
\end{frame}

\begin{frame}
\frametitle{First Frame}
My content
\end{frame}

\end{document}

Printing Beamer Slides

Every now and then I’d go wild with \pause and \item in my Beamer presentations, to present information piecewise. (I’m aware that some people disapproves this.) (By the way, the Manhattan theme is a Keynote lookalike.)

\documentclass{beamer}
\usetheme{Manhattan}

\begin{document}
\begin{frame}
\frametitle{First Slide}

\begin{theorem}[Newton’s First Law]
Every body remains in a state of constant velocity unless acted upon by an external unbalanced force.
\end{theorem}
\pause
\begin{itemize}
\item First item in a list
\begin{enumerate}
\item First item in a list
\item Second item in a list
\end{enumerate}
\item Second item in a list
\end{itemize}
\end{frame}

\end{document}

For archival and distribution purposes, I usually invoke

\documentclass[trans]{beamer}

to get a PDF file in which all the overlays are “condensed” to their respective single slides.

When it comes to printing the slides for my own reference, though, I often prefer to have the presentations 4-up on an A4 sheet. In addition, the Manhattan themed presentation isn’t really printer-friendly. So I’d instruct Beamer to only use the Manhattan theme in beamer and trans modes; and that it should use some mostly-white theme as well, as placing the slides 4-up on an A4 paper in handout mode (code lifted from the Beamer manual).

\documentclass{beamer}
% \documentclass[handout]{beamer}
% \documentclass[trans]{beamer}

\mode{
\usetheme{Manhattan}
}

\mode{
\usetheme{default}
\usepackage{pgfpages,pgf}
\pgfpagesuselayout{4 on 1}[a4paper, landscape, border shrink=5mm]
\pgfpageslogicalpageoptions{1}{border code=\pgfstroke}
\pgfpageslogicalpageoptions{2}{border code=\pgfstroke}
\pgfpageslogicalpageoptions{3}{border code=\pgfstroke}
\pgfpageslogicalpageoptions{4}{border code=\pgfstroke}
}

Running pdflatex while activating the handout mode then gives me this output:

Just remember to process your file twice every time you change the mode, so that all hyperlinks and bookmarks are updated properly.